African Journal of
Agricultural Research

  • Abbreviation: Afr. J. Agric. Res.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 1991-637X
  • DOI: 10.5897/AJAR
  • Start Year: 2006
  • Published Articles: 6691

Full Length Research Paper

Modelling approaches for addressing complexity in plant health management

J. A. Quijano-Carranza
  • J. A. Quijano-Carranza
  • CA Ingeniería de Biosistemas. División de Investigación y Postgrado. Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Autónoma de Querétaro; Cerro de las Campanas s/n, 76010, Querétaro, Qro. México
  • Google Scholar
R. R. Peniche-Vera
  • R. R. Peniche-Vera
  • CA Instrumentación y Control. División de Investigación y Postgrado. Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Autónoma de Querétaro; Cerro de las Campanas s/n, 76010, Querétaro, Qro. México.
  • Google Scholar
J. I. López-Arroyo
  • J. I. López-Arroyo
  • Programa de Entomología. Campo Experimental General Terán, Km 31, Carr. Montemorelos-China, Col. Exhacienda las Anacuas, 67413, General Terán N. L., México. Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Forestales, Agrícolas y Pecuarias (INIFAP).
  • Google Scholar
J. A. Aguirre-Gómez
  • J. A. Aguirre-Gómez
  • Programa de recursos genéticos. Campo experimental Bajío, INIFAP, Km 6.5, Carr. Celaya-San Miguel Allende, 38010. Celaya Gto. México.
  • Google Scholar
R. G. Guevara-González
  • R. G. Guevara-González
  • CA Ingeniería de Biosistemas. División de Investigación y Postgrado. Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Autónoma de Querétaro; Cerro de las Campanas s/n, 76010, Querétaro, Qro. México.
  • Google Scholar
E. Rico-García
  • E. Rico-García
  • CA Ingeniería de Biosistemas. División de Investigación y Postgrado. Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Autónoma de Querétaro; Cerro de las Campanas s/n, 76010, Querétaro, Qro. México.
  • Google Scholar
R. Yáñez-López
  • R. Yáñez-López
  • CA Ingeniería de Biosistemas. División de Investigación y Postgrado. Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Autónoma de Querétaro; Cerro de las Campanas s/n, 76010, Querétaro, Qro. México.
  • Google Scholar
M. I. Hernández-Zul
  • M. I. Hernández-Zul
  • CA Instrumentación y Control. División de Investigación y Postgrado. Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Autónoma de Querétaro; Cerro de las Campanas s/n, 76010, Querétaro, Qro. México.
  • Google Scholar
I. G. Herrera Ruiz
  • I. G. Herrera Ruiz
  • CA Instrumentación y Control. División de Investigación y Postgrado. Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Autónoma de Querétaro; Cerro de las Campanas s/n, 76010, Querétaro, Qro. México
  • Google Scholar
I. Torres-Pacheco
  • I. Torres-Pacheco
  • CA Ingeniería de Biosistemas. División de Investigación y Postgrado. Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Autónoma de Querétaro; Cerro de las Campanas s/n, 76010, Querétaro, Qro. México.
  • Google Scholar


  •  Received: 11 November 2010
  •  Accepted: 10 June 2014
  •  Published: 26 August 2014

Abstract

Harmful organisms affect the quality and quantity of food production. In a world of increasing changes in climatic, economic and social conditions, the design of effective measures against these organisms requires more accurate information. Mathematical models provide a scientific and quantitative language to describe the complex relationships that causes pest outbreaks. With the goal of analysing options to deal with this complexity, we discuss different mathematical approaches to modelling. The best model to support plant protection decisions will vary with each situation. Mathematical models range from very simple correlations between events to complex comprehensive systems of differential equations used to represent the dynamics of processes. Large-scale scenarios at the national or continental level can be supported adequately with simple, static and general models. Analytical or descriptive dynamic models are the best options to support pest management in well-defined regions or locations with little variation in external factors. Explanatory dynamic models are needed when great variations in pest behaviour are expected as a result of higher-order interactions with the host and the environment. If necessary, a quantitative analysis can be performed using mathematical modelling. In practice, the feasibility of such a quantitative analysis will depend on the time available for decision-making and data collection concerning the problem.

 

Key words:  Mathematical models, plant health, predictive models.