African Journal of
Microbiology Research

  • Abbreviation: Afr. J. Microbiol. Res.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 1996-0808
  • DOI: 10.5897/AJMR
  • Start Year: 2007
  • Published Articles: 5211

Full Length Research Paper

A comparative study of microbial load, chemical and sensory characteristics of camel meats collected from supermarkets and butcher shops

Al-jasser, M. S.1* and Al-jasass, F. M.2
  1College of Food and Agricultural Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition Sciences, King Saud University, P. O. Box 2460, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia. 2King Abdul-Aziz City for Science and Technology, General of Directorate of Research Grants P. O. Box 6068, Riyadh 11411, Saudi Arabia.
Email: [email protected]

  •  Accepted: 29 August 2011
  •  Published: 23 November 2011

Abstract

 

This study was set out to identify microbial load, chemical, and sensory characteristics of camel meats collected in the winter and summer seasons from both butchery shops and supermarkets butcheries. On day 0, the viable cell count, Pseudomonas count,Streptococcus fecal, coliform fecal count, Staphylococcus count and Staphylococcus aureus were higher in the summer as compared with winter season. Also, the data showed that the numbers of microorganisms were affected by seasoning and storage temperature. On day 0, the total viable count in camel meat sample collected in the winter and summer was 5.6 and 6 log10 CFU/g and increased to 6.7 and 8.4 log10 CFU/g, respectively after 48 h of storage at refrigerator temperature 7±1°C. Pseudomonas count in winter and summer samples on day 0 was 4.4 and 7.5 log 10 CFU/g, respectively. After 48 h of storage, the Pseudomonas count increased and reached 6.2 and 7.7 log10 CFU/g.Streptococcus fecal count in winter and summer sample was 3 and 4.2, and increased to 3.4 and 5.1 log10 CFU/g during storage at 7±1°C, respectively. Coliform fecal count in winter and summer sample was 2.4 and 4.2 but increased to 2.7 in winter sample and decreased to 2 log10 CFU/g in summer sample. The initial Staphylococcus count in camel meat collected in winter was 3.2 and 5.5 log10 CFU/g in the summer and reached 3.8 and 5.9 log10 CFU/g after 48 h in the refrigerator temperature. S. aureus count in winter sample on day 0 was 2.5 and 5.8 log10 CFU/g in summer sample and reached 3.3 and 5.6 log10 CFU/g after 48 h in the refrigerator temperature. There were no significant differences in thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) in camel meat collected in the winter and summer seasons. However, there were significant differences in TBARS in camel meat collected in supermarkets butchery and from butchery shops. There were significant differences of lightness, redness and yellowness P≤0.05 after 48 h in storage. However, there were no significant differences in the meat color of the second and third day of storage. Overall, there were no significant differences between the results obtained during the summer and winter periods, which means that seasons do not have a significant   impact on the values of Hunter lab instrument.

 

Key words: Microbial load, chilling, freezing temperature, camel meat, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS).