International Journal of
Fisheries and Aquaculture

  • Abbreviation: Int. J. Fish. Aquac.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 2006-9839
  • DOI: 10.5897/IJFA
  • Start Year: 2010
  • Published Articles: 227

Full Length Research Paper

Assessing the impact of a budget cage technology on Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) production in the Bontanga, Golinga and Libga reservoirs in Northern Ghana, Africa

Fuseini Tia Iddrisu
  • Fuseini Tia Iddrisu
  • Department of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources Management, University for Development Studies, Tamale, Ghana.
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Bosompem Ahunoabobirim Agya
  • Bosompem Ahunoabobirim Agya
  • Department of Fisheries and Watershed Management, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana.
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Regina Esi. Edziyie
  • Regina Esi. Edziyie
  • Department of Fisheries and Watershed Management, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana.
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Benjamin Betey Campion
  • Benjamin Betey Campion
  • Department of Fisheries and Watershed Management, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana.
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Daniel Nsoh Akongyuure
  • Daniel Nsoh Akongyuure
  • Department of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources Management, University for Development Studies, Tamale, Ghana.
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Daniel Adjei-Boateng
  • Daniel Adjei-Boateng
  • Department of Fisheries and Watershed Management, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana.
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  •  Received: 22 December 2021
  •  Accepted: 22 August 2022
  •  Published: 30 September 2022

Abstract

The potential of irrigation reservoirs in northern Ghana to support Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) production in 1 m3 budget cages was assessed over six-months in three reservoirs (Bontanga, Golinga and Libga). Fingerlings with a mean weight of 17.0 ± 5.0 g were randomly stocked at 50, 100, 150, 200 and 250 fish per cage in duplicate and fed with a commercial tilapia feed (Raanan, 30% protein level) at 3 to 5% body weight. The results indicated that the lower densities (50 and 100 fish m-3) had a higher specific growth rate (SGR) compared to higher densities (150-250 fish m-3). The gross yield (7.5–23.1 kg cage-1) differed with increasing density on all reservoirs. Consumers in the Tamale Metropolis preferred small sized tilapias (5-6 fish kg-1) and were willing to pay US$ 1.40-2.34 kg-1 of fish, while restaurants preferred 2-3 fish kg-1 and were willing to pay US$ 3.27- 3.51 kg-1. The 200 fish m-3 stocking density was the most profitable and is recommended for cage culture on reservoirs in northern Ghana.

Key words: Cage culture, growth performance, consumer preferences, Nile tilapia, reservoirs.