Journal of
Public Health and Epidemiology

  • Abbreviation: J. Public Health Epidemiol.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 2141-2316
  • DOI: 10.5897/JPHE
  • Start Year: 2009
  • Published Articles: 653

Full Length Research Paper

Investigation of cluster cases of urinary bilharziasis in the health area of Klemeklo, Northwest Bouake, 2017

S. I. Soumahoro
  • S. I. Soumahoro
  • Regional Office, National Institute of Public Hygiene, Bouaké, Cote d’ivoire.
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D. P. Kouassi
  • D. P. Kouassi
  • Regional Office, National Institute of Public Hygiene, Bouaké, Cote d’ivoire.
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K. D. Zika
  • K. D. Zika
  • University Hospital, Bouaké, Cote d’ivoire.
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M. Coulibaly
  • M. Coulibaly
  • Regional Office, National Institute of Public Hygiene, Bouaké, Cote d’ivoire.
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A. D. Kouame
  • A. D. Kouame
  • Regional Office, National Institute of Public Hygiene, Bouaké, Cote d’ivoire.
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S. Yéo
  • S. Yéo
  • Regional Office, National Institute of Public Hygiene, Bouaké, Cote d’ivoire.
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A. M. Sokodogo
  • A. M. Sokodogo
  • Regional Office, National Institute of Public Hygiene, Bouaké, Cote d’ivoire.
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E. A. E. Amani
  • E. A. E. Amani
  • University Hospital, Bouaké, Cote d’ivoire.
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M. S. M. L. Tanoh
  • M. S. M. L. Tanoh
  • University Hospital, Bouaké, Cote d’ivoire.
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A. Moumouni
  • A. Moumouni
  • Ministry of Public Health, Population and Social Affairs, Niger.
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G. H. A. Yao
  • G. H. A. Yao
  • Regional Office, National Institute of Public Hygiene, Bouaké, Cote d’ivoire.
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M. -E. Ebouat
  • M. -E. Ebouat
  • Department of Public Health, Alassane Ouattara University, Bouaké, Cote d’ivoire.
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K.D Adoubryn
  • K.D Adoubryn
  • University Hospital, Bouaké, Cote d’ivoire.
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N. S. Dagnan
  • N. S. Dagnan
  • Department of Public Health, Felix Houphouet Boigny University, Abidjan, Cote d’ivoire.
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  •  Received: 21 July 2023
  •  Accepted: 24 August 2023
  •  Published: 31 August 2023

Abstract

Bilharzia is one of the major neglected tropical diseases with high morbidity in poor countries in tropical regions. In Côte d'Ivoire, the prevalence of bilharziasis varies from less than 1% to over 90%, depending on the region. It is the highest among school-age children. In March 2017, an epidemiological investigation of clustered cases of urinary bilharziasis was conducted in the village of Gbangaoukpli, a health area in the Bouaké North-West district. This was the descriptive phase of an investigation report, which consisted of detecting all the cases, describing them and confirming them biologically. The aim was not to determine the aetiology of the phenomenon, as the description of the cases met the definition of suspected cases of urinary bilharziasis. The investigation was conducted in March 2017 in the village of Gbangaoukpli, a health area in the Bouaké North-West district. The investigation consisted of an active search for cases in the village, based on a definition of suspected cases of urinary bilharziasis. 119 suspected cases have been identified. Suspected cases were interviewed using a questionnaire, and urine and stool samples were taken. Urine samples were analyzed by the urine centrifugation method and stool samples by the simplified Ritchie technique. The data collected were analyzed using Epiinfo 7.0 software. Prevalence was estimated at 47.9% in children under 15.  Bathing in a river close to the village (89.92%), washing in the river (88.24%) and faecal peril (74.79%) were all reported. All 10 urine samples taken were positive (100%) for Schistosoma haematobium. The habits that can lead to urinary bilharziasis have been proven and well-documented. The aim of this investigation was to identify these habits. Urinary bilharziasis in Côte d'Ivoire continues to affect the most vulnerable populations, especially children living in areas without a drinking water supply.

Key words: Bouaké, epidemiology, Ivory Coast, urinary bilharziasis.