African Journal of
Agricultural Research

  • Abbreviation: Afr. J. Agric. Res.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 1991-637X
  • DOI: 10.5897/AJAR
  • Start Year: 2006
  • Published Articles: 6849

Full Length Research Paper

Adaptability evaluation of US-developed soybean recombinant inbred lines in Rwandan conditions

Daniel Niykiza
  • Daniel Niykiza
  • Rwanda Agriculture Board, P. O. Box 5016, Rubona, Huye District, Huye, Rwanda.
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Tarek Hewezi
  • Tarek Hewezi
  • Department of Plant Sciences, University of Tennessee, 2505 EJ Chapman Dr., Knoxville TN 37996-4541, United States.
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Tom Gill
  • Tom Gill
  • Smith Center for International Sustainable Agriculture, University of Tennessee, McCord 101C, 2640 Morgan Cir Dr, Knoxville, TN 37996, United States.
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Carl Sams
  • Carl Sams
  • Department of Plant Sciences, University of Tennessee, 2505 EJ Chapman Dr., Knoxville TN 37996-4541, United States.
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Tessa Burch-Smith
  • Tessa Burch-Smith
  • Donald Danforth Plant Science Center, 975 N Warson Rd., St. Louis, MO 63132, United States.
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Vince Pantalone
  • Vince Pantalone
  • Department of Plant Sciences, University of Tennessee, 2505 EJ Chapman Dr., Knoxville TN 37996-4541, United States.
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  •  Received: 23 February 2024
  •  Accepted: 14 May 2024
  •  Published: 31 May 2024

Abstract

About 70% of the Rwandan population live on agriculture-related activities. Soybean is among the selected priority crops that are supported by the government through the agriculture sector subsidy program. However, the national production and yields per hectare remain very low compared to other countries such as the USA. Yet demand for soybean products and byproducts is increasing. On the list factors limiting soybean production, the narrow germplasm is ranked first. We introduced and tested a US-developed soybean population of 115 recombinant inbred lines segregating for yield among other factors. The lines were tested during the cropping seasons B2019 and A2020 where they were grown at two research stations using a randomized complete block design (RCBD) with three replications. At one of the stations in the low altitudes the top yielder from the US-developed RIL outperformed the high-yielding local check by almost 1.2 MT/ha. A total of 32 RILs yielded more than the local check. At the other station, the general performance of the RIL population was in the range of the top performing local check. In general, our data suggest that the US-developed population, though from a temperate zone, can easily adapt in some agroecological zones of Rwanda. 

Key words: soybean, introduction, yield, cropping seasons.