African Journal of
Agricultural Research

  • Abbreviation: Afr. J. Agric. Res.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 1991-637X
  • DOI: 10.5897/AJAR
  • Start Year: 2006
  • Published Articles: 6576

Full Length Research Paper

Soil fertility status, fertilizer application and nutrient balance in SNNPR, southern Ethiopia in contrasting agro-ecological zones of Ethiopia

Francis Abuye
  • Francis Abuye
  • Department of Natural Resource Management, Wachemo University, Hosanna, Ethiopia.
  • Google Scholar
Mitiku Haile
  • Mitiku Haile
  • Department of Land Resource Management and Environmental Protection, Mekelle University, Tigray, Ethiopia.
  • Google Scholar
Wassie Haile
  • Wassie Haile
  • College of Agricultural Science, Department of Plant and Horticulture, Hawassa University, Sidamo, Ethiopia.
  • Google Scholar
Befekadu G/Hanna
  • Befekadu G/Hanna
  • College of Agricultural Science, Department of Plant and Horticulture, Hawassa University, Sidamo, Ethiopia.
  • Google Scholar


  •  Received: 21 May 2021
  •  Accepted: 28 September 2021
  •  Published: 30 November 2021

Abstract

Soil fertility status evolution is a decision making tool for the sustainable soil nutrient management. To evaluate its status, about 29 research data were collected and meta data analysis were made using SPSS for the selected soil chemical parameters. The soil was moderately acidic and salt free, 93.2% of Zinc (Zn), 100% of Manganese (Mn), 100% of Iron (Fe) and 79.3% of Copper (Cu) status were in sufficient range respectively. However, 44.7% of Phosphorus (P) and 72.3% exchangeable Potassium (K) status were found in a low range, 54.7% of organic carbon (OC) and 34.5% of total nitrogen were respectively found in a medium range, while 93.2% CEC was found in high range. The fertilizer recommendation can be done based on soil fertility status to economize crop production. Land use practices in agro ecosystems and plant species significantly influence the nutrient balance in the soil. According to this review, full nutrient balances of N, P and K in southern Ethiopia, across cropping types were (-31, +71 and -169) respectively. Accordingly, for the better crop production applying recommended fertilizers might be an option to replace the lost nutrients. Major crops (wheat, maize, teff, barley and sorghum) have reveled increased grain yield which were economically positive, indicating the potential of soil in the areas were in deficient levels, hence crops showed responses for fertilizer inputs. Therefore, balanced fertilizer use increase crop production and reduce environmental pollution.

Key words: Crop response, land use, nutrient flow balance, soil fertility status