African Journal of
History and Culture

  • Abbreviation: Afr. J. Hist. Cult.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN: 2141-6672
  • DOI: 10.5897/AJHC
  • Start Year: 2009
  • Published Articles: 183

Full Length Research Paper

The origin and disappearance of the Wambambali tradition and the succeeding Wagogo communities in Dodoma: Oral stories from elders

Kokeli Peter Ryano
  • Kokeli Peter Ryano
  • Department of History and Archaeology, College of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Dodoma, Tanzania.
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Augustino Mwakipesile
  • Augustino Mwakipesile
  • Department of Geography and Environmental Studies, College of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Dodoma, Tanzania.
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Emanuel Temu
  • Emanuel Temu
  • Ministry of Information, Culture, Arts, and Sports, Tanzania.
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Ngw’inamila Kasongi
  • Ngw’inamila Kasongi
  • Department of Geography and Environmental Studies, College of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Dodoma, Tanzania.
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Edwin Ngowi
  • Edwin Ngowi
  • Department of Development Studies, Sokoine University of Agriculture, Tanzania.
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Rehema Kilonzo
  • Rehema Kilonzo
  • Department of Sociology and Anthropology, College of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Dodoma, Tanzania.
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Sadasivuni Krishna Rao
  • Sadasivuni Krishna Rao
  • Department of History and Archaeology, College of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Dodoma, Tanzania.
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  •  Received: 10 November 2020
  •  Accepted: 19 July 2021
  •  Published: 31 July 2021

Abstract

The current fast growth of the city of Dodoma in central Tanzania threatens cultural heritage materials scattered on the landscape. However, natural processes such as weathering and erosion also add to this threat. Earlier, we reported on the existence of two cultural traditions on this landscape, the Middle Stone Age artefacts and the much younger Wambambali tradition based on pottery, grinding stones and remains of collapsed buildings. This paper presents qualitative data about the latter tradition from the perception of elders. Although our main focus was on the Wambambali tradition, elders broadened our scope and so we discuss the Wambambali on the wider perspective that includes succeeding communities, the Wagogo. Interview and focus group discussion techniques were used to collect data. The current whereabout of the Wambambali people is not known but there are two suggestions: The majority went south while a small group may have gone to the north. On the other hand, the Wagogo communities are formed by founders from different ethnic groups and regions and elders involved in our research predominantly trace their origins to the Hehe and Bena communities in today’s Iringa/Njombe regions. The collective name for these incoming groups came to be known as Wagogo.

 

Key words: Origin, disappearance, Wambambali tradition, Wagogo, cultural heritage.